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MOT Bridge: Track One

Track 1: 112 Credits - For those students with an associate's degree and at least one year of full-time work experience as an OTA or PTA. The first year consists of 31 credits at the undergraduate level that will prepare you for the master's degree. 

Curriculum & Schedules

Code Course Name Credit Hours
BIO151 Anatomy & Physiology 2 with Lab 4

This course involves a study of the structural anatomy and physiological functioning of the senses, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, nervous, and urinary systems.
Laboratory topics include the dissection of neurological organs to study gross and histological structure as well as the evaluation of selected physiological, clinical, and diagnostic tests.

MAT120 Statistics 3

This is an introduction to the basic descriptive and inferential statistics for students from all disciplines. It emphasizes the development of statistical literacy and the use of computer for analyzing data. Topics include principles of experimental design; graphical and numerical methods for summarizing, describing, exploring and analyzing data; binomial and normal probability distributions; point and interval estimates for means and proportions; hypothesis testing; and correlation and regression (Pre-requisite: MAT104 or appropriate placement test score).

OTB301 Social Policy in Health Care 3

This course focuses on current and historical factors influencing the development of social and health care policies to promote overall awareness of the health care delivery system and processes, as well as selected health issues important to individual consumers and health care professionals. There will be special emphasis on the influence of political, economic, social, and cultural factors in the development of health and social policy. Themes that run throughout the course include the importance of understanding the interrelationships between politics, culture, socioeconomic status, health status, and health care delivery; cross-cultural comparisons; issues of quality, access, and cost; ethical dilemmas; legal concerns; and the need for health professionals to serve as activists within the wider social system.
Course is a requirement of the 3-Year M.O.T. Bridge program.
Prerequisites: Permission of the department
Offered spring semester only

OTB302 Research & Writing in Health Care 3

Effective health and human services professionals use evidence from research to plan effective programs. This class introduces the theory of evidence-based practice and basic research principles. Students will engage with the American Psychological Association’s (APA) guidelines to writing and reporting evidence-based literature. Research types and levels (per AOTA) will be explored. Students write a research proposal supported by an extensive literature review on a topic related to occupational therapy.
Course is a requirement of the 3-Year M.O.T. Bridge program.
Prerequisites: Permission of the department
Offered spring semester only

OTB303 Communicating in Health Care Systems 3

This course builds a bridge from a students' general education to the work done in the health-care system. With the aim of preparing students for both professional life and graduate work, this course introduces interdisciplinary strategies for investigating provocative issues and for communicating to others about them. In this way, the course offers students time to learn and to practice more advanced skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Cultural awareness, health care literacy, collaboration, and communication will all be addressed with a health care systems focus. The course emphasizes fundamental principles of communication with time-on-task and real world, discipline-specific models for communication tasks. Appropriate forms of communication in a health care setting and clinical expectations for professionalism will be addressed.
Course is a requirement of the 3-Year M.O.T. Bridge program.
Prerequisites: Permission of the department
Offered fall semester only

OTB304 Play and Leisure 3

Occupational therapy consumers find meaning in many activities of daily living, including play and leisure. Throughout this course, students will explore the roles play and leisure have in cognitive, physical, and social development in childhood, and health and wellness in adulthood. Students will learn play and leisure concepts, understand methods to use play and leisure activities for rehabilitation, and develop client-centered play and leisure activities to meet client goals.
Course is a requirement of the 3-Year M.O.T. Bridge program.
Prerequisites: Permission of the department
Offered fall semester only

OTP500 Introduction to Occupational Therapy with Lab 4

Basic concepts important to occupational therapy are addressed. National, state, and local organizations important to the occupational therapist are covered. Foundations for teaching and learning, ethics, and clinical skills are introduced. Students will practice teaching and learning concepts using media common in occupational therapy. The history of occupational therapy, the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework, and activity analysis are covered. Students participate in analyzing activities across the lifespan for therapeutic value. Medical terminology, observation, interview, health history, and occupational profile are also addressed.
Offered spring semester only

OTP502 Integrated Anatomy with Lab 4

This course examines musculoskeletal and peripheral nervous system anatomy in the context of human movement and function, through lecture and lab. In the lab, students develop a working knowledge of anatomical structures with the use of computer models, bones, and prosected cadavers. The lecture component expands on students’ knowledge of structures by exploring the function of the musculoskeletal system, including movement analysis, joint mobility and function. Anatomy and function of the integumentary and lymphatic systems is also reviewed. Selected pathology related to the musculoskeletal, integumentary system, and lymphatic systems are examined to support students’ application of anatomy concepts to clinically relevant knowledge. Students are responsible for their own transportation to off-campus cadaver labs. There is a $200 per student lab fee for this course. Co-requisite: OTP 500 and permission of the department

OTP504 Foundations of Neuroscience 3

This course will focus on the application of anatomy and function of the human nervous systems and its role in development, movement, sensation, cognition, perception and behavior to support the understanding of neurorehabilitation practice. Normal function and dysfunction of the peripheral and central nervous systems will be reviewed including the spinal cord, brainstem, cerebrum, visual and vestibular systems. Concepts and knowledge will be linked to selected neurological disorders, clinical problems and case studies. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: OTP 500 and permission of the department

OTP506 Research 1: Utilization of Research for EBP 2

Examination of the research process, statistical analysis, and evidence-based practice with applicability to occupational therapy practice. Attention is given to critical research methods, analysis, and ethical aspects of scholarly inquiry. Emphasis on how research contributes to the development of occupational therapy knowledge, improves practice, supports the design of occupational therapy support systems, and enhances the education and professional accountability of occupational therapists. Co-requisite: OTP 500 and permission of the department

OTP510 Professional Development I: Evidence, Advocacy & Health Care Policy 3

This course addresses professional issues in the delivery of healthcare services. Students will gain an understanding of the roles of occupational therapy practitioners in advocating for consumers and for the profession, as well as the community role of occupational therapy educators. In addition, students gain knowledge and skill in clinical reasoning, the effects of health and disability on individuals, family, and society. Social, economic, political, and demographic influences in healthcare will also be analyzed. Reimbursement in managed care, medical models, community models, health promotion, and wellness models are introduced. Global healthcare and sociocultural competence are addressed with an emphasis on advocacy for clients and the occupational therapy profession. Co-requisite: OTP 500 and permission of the department

OTP511 Professional Development II: Research II Systematic Review 3

Occupational Therapy students will learn how to conduct a systematic literature review and develop the skills to develop a research proposal built on a framework of evidence-based practice. This course combines didactic sessions with substantial literature research work to create a research proposal. Students will be taught how to perform each step in a proposal, will be expected to apply to a topic of their choosing, and present their findings to OT faculty and students. Prerequisite: OTP 506 and permission of the department Co-requisite: OTP 510

OTP513 Professional Development IV: Occupational Therapy Management 3

Students learn the management functions of an occupational therapy department or business including planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. The course integrates students' knowledge of interventions with information related to the delivery of occupational therapy services. Topics include managed care, quality assurance, leadership, regulatory agencies, third party reimbursement, models of service delivery, supervision and consultation. Students gain a practical understanding of strategic planning, budgeting, marketing, program evaluation and ethical problem- solving in administration. Prerequisite or Corequisite: OTP 511

OTP514 Neuroscience 3

Topics covered include the major structures and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems. This course will build on previous learnings and focus on the application of the anatomy and functions of the human nervous systems and its role in development, movement, sensation, cognition, perception, and behavior to support the understanding of neuro-rehabilitative practice. Normal function and dysfunction of the peripheral and central nervous systems will be reviewed including the spinal cord, brainstem, cerebrum, auditory, visual, and vestibular systems. Concepts and knowledge will be linked to selected neurological disorders, clinical problems, and case studies. A heavy emphasis on application and assessment within occupational therapy practice will be used throughout this course. Prerequisites: OTP500, OTP504, and OTP506

OTP515 OT Professional Reasoning and Skills 2

This course provides students the opportunity to develop clinical reasoning abilities and documentation skills. Therapeutic use of self will be explored including self-assessment and reflection. Basic clinical skills necessary for entry level practice will be acquired. Prerequisites: OTP500, OTP506

OTP521 Level I Fieldwork: Psychosocial Health & Wellness 1

Students will enrich their OT coursework through directed observation and interaction with individuals within a variety of community psychosocial settings. Students will have the opportunity to practice professional behaviors, communication, and leadership skills. Students will engage in reflective activities to support further learning and development of OT clinical reasoning. Students are responsible for their own transportation to clinical sites.

OTP522 Level I Fieldwork: Pediatric Occupations 1

Students will enrich their coursework through directed observation and interaction with clients in a variety of pediatric settings. Students will have the opportunity to practice professional behaviors, communication, and leadership skills. Students will engage in reflective activities to support further learning and development of OT clinical reasoning. Students are responsible for their own transportation to clinical sites

OTP523 Level I Fieldwork: Adult Occupations 1

Students will enrich their coursework through directed observation and interaction with adult populations in a variety of clinical and community settings. Students will have the opportunity to practice professional behaviors, communication, and leadership skills. Students will engage in reflective activities to support further learning and development of OT clinical reasoning. Students are responsible for their own transportation to clinical sites.

OTP530 Psychological/Social/Cognitive Components of Living I with Lab 4

Pathology, assessment media, and general treatment approaches in mental health and cognitive settings are addressed. Students learn several assessments from different frames of reference and are introduced to the documentation of evaluations. Safety and suicide precautions are highlighted. Using the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework as the foundation, students learn several treatment modalities. There is a $50 Materials Fee for this course. Prerequisite or Corequisite: OTP 500 and permission of department

OTP531 Psychological/Social/Cognitive Components of Living II with Lab 4

Group and individual treatments in mental health and cognitive settings are covered in detail. Using the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework as the foundation, students learn several treatment modalities, including assertiveness training, social skills, projective arts, relaxation, sensory integrative techniques, and cognitive approaches. Interventions techniques, treatment planning, and documentation are considered in a variety of inpatient, outpatient and community-based settings. There is a $50 Materials Fee for this course. Prerequisites: OTP 530 and permission of the department.

OTP540 Sensorimotor Components of Living I with Lab 4

The first course in the sensorimotor series focuses on occupational therapy evaluation and treatment of adults with orthopedic, systemic, and traumatic disorders. The etiology, signs, symptoms, medical management of common medical and orthopedic disorders will be reviewed and their impact on occupational performance will be explored. Assessment and treatment approaches will focus on biomechanical and rehabilitation frames of reference. The occupational therapy process will be reviewed and students will begin to develop clinical reasoning skills through assessment and treatment planning assignments. There is a $50 Materials Fee for this course. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: OTP 500, OTP 502, OTP 504, OTP 506, OTP 514, OTP 515, and permission of department

OTP541 Sensorimotor Components of Living II with Lab 4

The second course in the sensorimotor series focuses on occupational therapy evaluation and treatment of adults with neurological disorders. The etiology, signs, symptoms, medical management of common neurological disorders will be reviewed and their impact on occupational performance will be explored. Assessment and treatment approaches will focus on neurophysiological frames of reference. Compensatory methods (covered in OTP 540) will be applied to individuals and populations with neurological disorders. Students will build on clinical reasoning skills introduced in OTP 540 through additional assessment and treatment planning assignments. There is a $50 Materials Fee for this course. Prerequisites: OTP 504, 540 and permission of the department.

OTP542 Sensorimotor Components of Living III with Lab 4

The third course in the sensorimotor series focuses on assessment and treatment of the geriatric population. Theories of aging are introduced and used to adapt occupational therapy interventions learned in OTP 540 and 541 to the unique needs of older adults. Additional issues unique to the again population are addressed, including Medicare, aging in place, falls, driving and community mobility, and end-of-life issues. The etiology, signs, symptoms, and medical management of disorders typically seen in a geriatric population will also be covered. The use of client-centered practice and meaningful occupation will be emphasized. There is a $50 Materials Fee for this course. Prerequisites or Co-requisite: OTP 531, OTP 541, and permission of the department

OTP543 Therapeutic Modalities 1

Appropriate application of physical agent modalities is introduced and reviewed along with the opportunity to practice application of selected modalities. Orthotic fabrication and application is taught via classroom format and lab experience. Safety, precautions and contraindications for specified procedures is emphasized during instruction of physical agent modalities, infection control and wound care, and use of orthoses. Prerequisites: OTP502, OTP504, OTP540

OTP550 Developmental Components of Living I with Lab 4

The content covered in this course, along with the subsequent course, Developmental Components II, addresses the practice of occupational therapy related to infants, children, and youth. The two courses span the developmental sequence from birth through adolescence and address the typical occupations at each stage. In this course, instruction is designed to establish a knowledge base to effectively address typical and atypical development throughout childhood and adolescence. Students will gain an understanding of the roles of OT practitioners when working with families, within medical settings, and in the community (schools, day care centers, neighborhoods, etc.) to address the functional needs of children and families. Creating a foundation for assessment and data collection for the second course, students will learn about basic screening tools and methods that are appropriate for this population. Content also includes methods to identify meaningful activities for children and families and planning intervention to meet these needs. There is a $50 Materials Fee for this course.

OTP551 Developmental Components of Living II with Lab 4

The content covered in this course, along with the preceding course, Developmental Components I, addresses the practice of occupational therapy related to infants, children, and youth. The two courses span the developmental sequence from birth through adolescence and address the typical occupations at each stage. Instruction builds on a cumulative knowledge base to effectively address typical and atypical development throughout childhood. Building on previous coursework in assessment and data collection, students will learn the outcome measures and assessment methods that are appropriate for children and families. Integration of previous coursework is embedded within the curriculum to develop appropriate occupation based intervention for the pediatric population. Common diagnoses of the children are included in case-based approaches. Emphasis is on the functional needs of the child within the family and community. There is a $50 Materials Fee for this course. Prerequisites: OTP 550 and permission of the department.

OTP560 Occupation and Technology 2

Uses of high to low technologies are covered, with a focus on using various technologies to support participation in meaningful activities. Students will become familiar with assistive devices, adaptive equipment, computer hardware/software, and other electronic devices that support participation of people with a range of disabilities. Students will also develop and/or adapt the tools of everyday living to support therapeutic and occupation-based activities for a range of client needs. This course will utilize both lecture and lab formats to enhance critical thinking and creativity with a variety of media in a fun and informative way. There is a $100 Materials Fee for this course. Prerequisites: OTP 500, 503; OTP 550 recommended, but not required; permission of department.

OTP566 OT Practice Settings 3

Current and emerging occupational therapy practice settings are explored. Students will be exposed to the different roles and responsibilities OTs may have within the workplace in various settings. Students will develop a clear understanding of occupational therapy across a continuum of care identifying the professions distinct value to various stakeholders. Prerequisites: OTP550, OTP540, OTP530, OTP513

OTP570 Advanced Seminar in Occupational Therapy 0.5

This advanced seminar studies occupational therapy treatment principles and applications in the context of Level ll fieldwork. Situation-based personal, professional, and ethical issues will be incorporated into discussion-based problem solving experiences. Study methods for the NBCOT examination are addressed, as well as licensure procedures. Fieldwork supervision models are applied to clinical practice. This class meets online with the academic fieldwork coordinator. Co-requisites: OTP 590 & 591, or permission of the department.

OTP571 Advanced Seminar in OT II 0.5

This advanced seminar studies occupational therapy treatment principles and applications in the context of Level II fieldwork. Situation-based personal, professional, and ethical issues will be incorporated into discussion-based problem-solving experiences. Study methods for the NBCOT examination are addressed, as well as licensure procedures. Fieldwork supervision models are applied to clinical practice. This class meets online while students are enrolled in OTP591.

OTP590 Level II Fieldwork 8

Supervised field experiences provide the student therapist with an opportunity to apply theory and clinical reasoning skills to the evaluation and treatment of people or populations across the lifespan, with a range of disabilities, in a variety of settings. OTP 590 and 591 are designed to provide students with in-depth experiences in delivering occupational therapy services to clients, focusing on meaningful occupation. Students will engage in reflective practice to embrace professional values as lifelong responsibilities of the occupational therapist, such as engaging in ethical practice, professional behaviors, and continued competence. The goal of level II fieldwork is to develop competent, entry-level, generalist occupational therapists. The fieldwork experiences are arranged and coordinated by the academic fieldwork coordinator according to the requirements of the American Occupational Therapy Association’s (AOTA) Accreditation Council of Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) and the Bay Path University Occupational Therapy Department. Attempts are made to meet students’ requests regarding practice setting and geographic location, however, student requests are not guaranteed. The sequence and dates of each level II fieldwork placement may be altered, depending on the availability of placement sites or the requirements of federal financial aid. Each course requires 12-weeks of fulltime fieldwork. Both fieldwork experiences (OTP 590 and 591 for a total of 24 weeks) must be completed within 24 months of the completion of coursework. These courses are graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisites: Completion of all OTP course requirements (except OTP 570) or permission of department. In addition, students must meet all level II fieldwork requirements stated in the most recent Bay Path University OT Student Handbook and requested by a student’s fieldwork site.

OTP591 Level II Fieldwork B 6

Supervised field experiences provide the student therapist with an opportunity to apply theory and clinical reasoning skills to the evaluation and treatment of people or populations across the lifespan, with a range of disabilities, in a variety of settings. OTP 590 and 591 are designed to provide students with in-depth experiences in delivering occupational therapy services to clients, focusing on meaningful occupation. Students will engage in reflective practice to embrace professional values as lifelong responsibilities of the occupational therapist, such as engaging in ethical practice, professional behaviors, and continued competence. The goal of level II fieldwork is to develop competent, entry-level, generalist occupational therapists. The fieldwork experiences are arranged and coordinated by the academic fieldwork coordinator according to the requirements of the American Occupational Therapy Association’s (AOTA) Accreditation Council of Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) and the Bay Path University Occupational Therapy Department. Attempts are made to meet students’ requests regarding practice setting and geographic location, however, student requests are not guaranteed. The sequence and dates of each level II fieldwork placement may be altered, depending on the availability of placement sites or the requirements of federal financial aid. Each course requires 12-weeks of fulltime fieldwork. Both fieldwork experiences (OTP 590 and 591 for a total of 24 weeks) must be completed within 24 months of the completion of coursework. These courses are graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisites: Completion of all OTP course requirements (except OTP 570) or permission of department. In addition, students must meet all level II fieldwork requirements stated in the most recent Bay Path University OT Student Handbook and requested by a student’s fieldwork site.

OTP591 Level II Fieldwork A 2

Supervised field experiences provide the student therapist with an opportunity to apply theory and clinical reasoning skills to the evaluation and treatment of people or populations across the lifespan, with a range of disabilities, in a variety of settings. OTP 590 and 591 are designed to provide students with in-depth experiences in delivering occupational therapy services to clients, focusing on meaningful occupation. Students will engage in reflective practice to embrace professional values as lifelong responsibilities of the occupational therapist, such as engaging in ethical practice, professional behaviors, and continued competence. The goal of level II fieldwork is to develop competent, entry-level, generalist occupational therapists. The fieldwork experiences are arranged and coordinated by the academic fieldwork coordinator according to the requirements of the American Occupational Therapy Association’s (AOTA) Accreditation Council of Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) and the Bay Path University Occupational Therapy Department. Attempts are made to meet students’ requests regarding practice setting and geographic location, however, student requests are not guaranteed. The sequence and dates of each level II fieldwork placement may be altered, depending on the availability of placement sites or the requirements of federal financial aid. Each course requires 12-weeks of fulltime fieldwork. Both fieldwork experiences (OTP 590 and 591 for a total of 24 weeks) must be completed within 24 months of the completion of coursework. These courses are graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisites: Completion of all OTP course requirements (except OTP 570) or permission of department. In addition, students must meet all level II fieldwork requirements stated in the most recent Bay Path University OT Student Handbook and requested by a student’s fieldwork site.

PHS101 Physics 3

This is a non-calculus based introduction to the principles of physics and their applications. The topics covered include kinematics, Newton's laws of motion, work energy, momentum, and rotational motion.

PSY205 Child Development 3

This course is a study of developmental changes from birth through 12 years old. Prenatal and neonatal issues are also discussed. Physical, emotional, social, and cognitive growth is explored at each age. The dominant theories of development are examined, as well as contemporary issues relating to childhood and parenting.

PSY206 Adolescent & Adult Development 3

This course surveys how people develop and change from the onset of adolescence through late adulthood. Different theoretical perspectives and contemporary information relating to the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive realms are examined.

SOC100 Principles of Sociology 3

This course introduces students to the major concepts and methods of sociology. Emphasis will be on the components of culture, the structure and institutions of society, the elements of social organization and differentiation, and sociological approaches to the analysis of groups.