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Criminal Justice On Ground Weekdays

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

A major in Criminal Justice prepares students for a variety of career options that reflect not only the law enforcement aspects of the field, but relate to positions in the court systems, corrections, security, social support organizations—such as women’s shelters or nonprofit agencies providing assistance, or homeland security, including border patrol or safety and disaster response.

Our Criminal Justice program examines criminal behaviors and society’s reaction to them in terms of prevention and response after the fact. Coursework encompasses areas pertaining to enforcement, criminology, advocacy, and social change. Students will take courses in legal studies, forensic studies, and forensic psychology to provide a broader understanding of the issues facing our communities. Bay Path’s program takes students beyond the classroom—from internships to experiential learning opportunities to volunteer work—developing a unique perspective on the field that becomes invaluable in practice.

Career Preparation:

  • Professional and ethical preparation for a career in criminal justice grounded in a thorough understanding of law, evidence, procedure and the operation of the American justice system.
  • Professional and ethical preparation for a career in law enforcement, corrections, probation and parole, corporate and private security, and the juvenile justice system.
  • Professional preparation that enables students to understand victimology and criminology. 

Course Requirements

Code Course Name Credits
CRJ120 Intro to Criminal Justice 3

This course will be an introduction to the criminal justice system in the United States. Crime, criminals, victims, explanations of criminal behavior, law and the criminal justice system, policing strategies, police and the law, courts and courtroom workgroups, proceedings before trial, conviction by trial and guilty pleas, sentencing, community corrections, prisons and jails, prison life and juvenile justice are the topics that will be covered. Offered in the fall semester

CRJ202 Victimology&Criminology 3

The scope of victimology, gauging the extent of criminal victimization, the costs of being a victim, remedying the plight of victims, restorative justice, victimization at work and school, and victim rights will be studied. Criminology and crime theory, different perspectives classical, biological, psychological, and sociological and measuring crime will be examined. Prerequisite CRJ 120 Offered in the fall semester

CRJ204 Principles of Policing 3

This course will introduce students to the principles of policing in the United States from its inception to the present. Police ethics, discretion, stress, culture, work, patrol operations, criminal and internal investigations, promotions, professional development and community policing will be examined. Prerequisite: CRJ 120 Offered in the spring semester

CRJ222 CrimInvAndElementsCrimLaw 3

The fundamentals of effective and professional criminal investigations will be studied, through the lens of the elements of criminal law. Crime scene procedures, evidence collection and preservation, forensic science technology, interview and interrogation techniques, use of informants to obtain information and intelligence, surveillance methods, writing comprehensive reports, identifying and arresting suspects, legal searches and the Fourth Amendment, investigating violent crimes against persons as well as property will be covered within this course. Prerequisite: CRJ 120 Offered in the spring semester

CRJ275 CrimProForCrimJustProf 3

Criminal Procedure will be examined with an emphasis on the varying, and sometimes conflicting, roles of professionals in law enforcement, including police, probation, parole, corrections, homeland security, and court administration. The course will cover police stop-and-frisks, probable cause, arrest, search and seizure, search warrants and affidavits, Miranda Rights, confessions and interrogations, line-ups and show-ups, investigations, informants, plain view doctrine, consent, exigent circumstances, right to counsel, due process, entrapment, and the exclusionary rule. Prerequisite: CRJ 120 Offered in the spring semester

CRJ300 Corrections 3

The basic organization and objectives of the American correctional system will be examined. Local, state, federal and private sector correctional systems and practices will be studied. Special categories of correctional clients male, female, juvenile, sex offenders, mentally and physically disabled or challenged, geriatric, and HIV will be considered. Prerequisite: CRJ 120

CRJ310 Comm in Criminal Justice 3

This course builds a bridge from students general education to the work they do in the field of criminal justice. With the aim of preparing students for both professional life and graduate work, this writing-intensive course introduces disciplinary strategies for investigating provocative issues and for communicating to others about them. In this way, the course offers students time to learn and to practice more advanced skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening; in using appropriate software support in presentations; and in mastering information literacy in the field of criminal justice. The course emphasizes fundamental principles of communication with time-on-task and real world, discipline-specific models for communication tasks. Prerequisites: ENG 114, ENG 122, and ENG 124

CRJ312 Criminal Evidence 3

Topics of study will include the burden of proof and burden of production for criminal trials, probation hearings, and parole violations; forms of criminal evidence; relevance; competency; direct and circumstantial evidence; exculpatory evidence; identification; authentication; expert testimony; admissions and confessions; the Hearsay Rule and its exceptions; character evidence; alibi evidence; and privileged communications. Criminal courtroom procedure, witness preparation, and both Grand Jury and courtroom testimony will be discussed. Multiple actual criminal case studies will be utilized throughout this course. Prerequisites: CRJ 120, CRJ 222, and CRJ 275 Offered in the spring semester

CRJ320 Probation & Parole 3

This course will explore the different roles and responsibilities of the probation and parole officer in the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on understanding an integrated model of supervision, developing of effective treatment plans, aftercare services, sanctions for non-compliance. The interplay between the police, prosecutors, judges, prison personnel, probation and parole officers will be examined. Prerequisite: CRJ 120 Offered in the fall semester

CRJ325 Criminal Organizations 3

This course will explore and compare the structure and characteristics of various criminal organizations. Common characteristics of criminal organizations, causes of organized crime, the businesses, the paradigms, the role of law enforcement, crime statutes, prosecution strategies, defenses, and sentencing. Different national and international groupsAsian, Russian, Latin American, Italian, Afrolineal, European, urban street gangs, prison gangs, and the evolving relationship between terrorism and organized crime will be studied. Prerequisite: CRJ 120 Offered in the fall semester

CRJ348 Terrorism&HomlandSecurity 3

This course seeks to theoretically and analytically examine the concept of terrorism. Students will analyze terrorist philosophies, motivations, and organizations. The course will explore the general tactics and concepts of terrorism. Students will study the law-enforcement response to terrorism, including the major implications of the War on Terror, the USA Patriot Act, and the impact on American civil liberties. Prerequisites: CRJ 120 Offered in the spring semester

CRJ402 Ethics&CrimJustProf 3

Ethical dilemmas frequently encountered by professionals--police, prosecutors, defense attorneys, probation officers, parole officers, court officers, judges and correctional officers--within the criminal justice system will be thoughtfully explored within a discussion based classroom setting. Prerequisites: CRJ 120 and Senior status Offered in the fall semester

CRJ498 Internship 3

(This course is graded Pass/Fail.) Students receive supervised training from practicing professionals, normally during their senior year. Learning is achieved through observation and/or direct participation. Students are placed appropriately in settings that apply to their individual career and educational objectives. Sites may include, for example: federal and state law enforcement agencies; the District Attorneys Office, Attorney Generals Office, or U.S. Attorneys Office; state and federal Public Defenders Offices; state and federal courts; municipal and state police departments; victim/witness assistance units; correctional facilities; state and federal probation and parole offices; and corporate security departments. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status, and permission of department advisor, CRJ 306 strongly recommended Offered in fall and spring semesters

CRJ499 Internship 6

(This course is graded Pass/Fail.) Students receive supervised training from practicing professionals, normally during their senior year. Learning is achieved through observation and/or direct participation. Students are placed appropriately in settings that apply to their individual career and educational objectives. Sites may include, for example: federal and state law enforcement agencies; the District Attorneys Office, Attorney Generals Office, or U.S. Attorneys Office; state and federal Public Defenders Offices; state and federal courts; municipal and state police departments; victim/witness assistance units; correctional facilities; state and federal probation and parole offices; and corporate security departments. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status, and permission of department advisor, CRJ 306 strongly recommended Offered in fall and spring semesters

ENG114 Critical Reading & Response 3

This course introduces the integration of communication skills essential for effective reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college level. In this writing intensive course, students develop composition skills to produce collegiate-level papers modeling rhetorical modes and thematic content in addition to strategies for reading complex texts; presentation skills for personal introductions, verbal summaries of readings and response writings, and peer review of papers; and basic technological skills for word processing, e-mail, and introductory-level online research.

ENG124 Research/Writing in Discipline 3

In this course students will apply the practices for effective reading and writing introduced in ENG 114 to the distinctive language and forms of various disciplines. This course lays the foundation for academic and professional research and stresses the use of appropriate and effective information sources. Readings for a variety of academic audiences will provide students with strategies to communicate in the sciences, business and technology, psychology, liberal studies, and the social sciences. Research and documentation skills appropriate to the disciplines are stressed. In addition to leading students through the research process from start to finish, this course will examine the many ramifications of academic honesty. Prerequisite: ENG 114

ENG134 Literary Genres 3

Selected readings in fiction, poetry, and drama introduce the student to literary types and techniques. These readings provide a basis for collegiate-level discussion, analysis, and the development of critical judgment. Building on the communications and research skills from earlier courses in the sequence, this course emphasizes continued practice in writing, and students complete a documented research paper using primary and secondary sources as one of the course writing assignments. Discussions and oral presentations based on assigned literature support the overall goal of the sequence: to enhance the advancement of the students, first academically and then professionally. Prerequisite: ENG 114

INT250 Research Methods in Social Sciences 3

Students will develop and understanding of the basic principles of research in the Social Sciences, grasp the importance of Scientific Research, and comprehend research methodologies. Reaserch ethics, data collection techniques and analysis, sampling, and inferential statistics will be studied. Students will be required to produce a scholarly proposal. Prerequisites: MAT120 and ENG124

MAT120 Statistics 3

This is an introduction to the basic descriptive and inferential statistics for students from all disciplines. It emphasizes the development of statistical literacy and the use of computer for analyzing data. Topics include principles of experimental design; graphical and numerical methods for summarizing, describing, exploring and analyzing data; binomial and normal probability distributions; point and interval estimates for means and proportions; hypothesis testing; and correlation and regression. Offered both semesters