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Course Requirements

Please note that course requirements are subject to change.

Code Course Name Credits
CIT300 Communicating for Leadership 3

As the final course in the CIT core, Communicating for Leadership serves as a bridge to upper-level courses in students fields of study. Furthermore, different sections are taught by instructors in these fields. This allows students to study the specialized communication styles and demands associated with effective leadership in their majors; that is, business majors study corporate communications; students in legal studies examine communication models and strategies for conflict resolution, liberal studies majors draw upon multimedia skills and technologies to enhance their communications, etc. Through readings, writing projects, discussions, and role-plays, students also study interpersonal communication skills, verbal and non-verbal communication, the dynamics and ethics of interviewing, and organizational and small group communication. While writing, reading, listening, and information literacy are integrated into the course, the course offers explicit instruction in public speaking and offers students opportunities to practice speaking to multiple and complex audiences in forums relevant to their fields of study.

Prerequisites: ENG 114, ENG124, ENG 134

COM111 Computer Applic. I 3

Computer Applications I
In this course, students will be provided a baseline of knowledge of the fundamentals of computers and digital literacies to ensure they will be able to understand a constantly changing technology oriented landscape. In this course, students will be exposed to the fundamentals of computing technology, including computer hardware and software concepts; the Windows operating system and commands; drives, folders, and files; Google’s suite of applications; use of the Internet and growing connectivity with everyday devices; and digital literacy knowledge and skills. By mastering the fundamentals of computing technology and demonstrating digital literacy, students will have the skills needed to thrive in the 21st century workforce.

ENG114 Critical Reading & Response 3

This course introduces the integration of communication skills essential for effective reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college level. In this writing intensive course, students develop composition skills to produce collegiate-level papers modeling rhetorical modes and thematic content in addition to strategies for reading complex texts; presentation skills for personal introductions, verbal summaries of readings and response writings, and peer review of papers; and basic technological skills for word processing, e-mail, and introductory-level online research.

ENG124 Research/Writing in Discipline 3

In this course students will apply the practices for effective reading and writing introduced in ENG 114 to the distinctive language and forms of various disciplines. This course lays the foundation for academic and professional research and stresses the use of appropriate and effective information sources. Readings for a variety of academic audiences will provide students with strategies to communicate in the sciences, business and technology, psychology, liberal studies, and the social sciences. Research and documentation skills appropriate to the disciplines are stressed. In addition to leading students through the research process from start to finish, this course will examine the many ramifications of academic honesty.
Prerequisite: ENG 114

ENG134 Literary Genres 3

Selected readings in fiction, poetry, and drama introduce the student to literary types and techniques. These readings provide a basis for collegiate-level discussion, analysis, and the development of critical judgment. Building on the communications and research skills from earlier courses in the sequence, this course emphasizes continued practice in writing, and students complete a documented research paper using primary and secondary sources as one of the course writing assignments. Discussions and oral presentations based on assigned literature support the overall goal of the sequence: to enhance the advancement of the students, first academically and then professionally.
Prerequisite: ENG 114

GEN ELEC General Electives 36  
GENHLTH Healthy Living Elective 2  
HISGEN History Elective 3  
HUMELE Humanities Elective 3  
MAT112 Applied University Mathematics 3

This course is designed for diverse students to acquire a solid foundation in non-calculus mathematics. It uses practical mathematics to develop problem solving and analytical skills. Topics include linear equations, linear inequalities, matrix and its application, linear programming, and the simplex method.
Prerequisite: MAT 104 or appropriate placement test score

MAT120 Statistics 3

This is an introduction to the basic descriptive and inferential statistics for students from all disciplines. It emphasizes the development of statistical literacy and the use of computer for analyzing data. Topics include principles of experimental design; graphical and numerical methods for summarizing, describing, exploring and analyzing data; binomial and normal probability distributions; point and interval estimates for means and proportions; hypothesis testing; and correlation and regression.
Offered both semesters

PSY101 Introduction to Psychology 1 3

Using an active learning approach, students will explore psychological perspectives and methods as explanations for human behavior and mental processes. Other topics include: neurophysiology, consciousness, learning, personality theories, and psychological disorders.

PSY205 Child Development 3

This course is a study of developmental changes from birth through 12 years old. Prenatal and neonatal issues are also discussed. Physical, emotional, social, and cognitive growth are explored at each age. The dominant theories of development are examined, as well as contemporary issues relating to childhood and parenting.
Prerequisite: PSY 101
Offered in the spring semester only

PSY206 Adolescent & Adult Development 3

This course surveys how people develop and change from the onset of adolescence through late adulthood. Different theoretical perspectives and contemporary information relating to the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive realms are examined.
Prerequisite: PSY 101
Offered in the fall semester only

PSY216 Psych of Cultural Diversity 3

This course is designed to assist, encourage, and challenge students to develop more fully their awareness and knowledge of self and others in a culturally pluralistic society. Basic concepts and ideas that are relevant to multicultural human service and development will be introduced. Culture and environment will be discussed as interactive experiences and basic dimensions of diverse groups will be explored.
Prerequisite: PSY 101
Offered in the fall semester only

PSY240 Abnormal Psychology 3

This course explores a wide range of personality, behavioral, and cognitive disorders. The symptoms, etiology, and dynamics of various disorders are studied, and a variety of therapeutic theories and techniques are discussed.
Prerequisite: PSY 101
Offered in the spring semester only

PSY321 Theories of Personality 3

This course investigates the major personality theorists from Freud to more recent and contemporary theorists like May and Rogers. Emphasis is placed on the critical evaluation and practical application of each theory reviewed.
Prerequisite: PSY 101 and junior or senior status
Offered in the spring semester only

PSY323 Behavioral Research Methods 3

This course introduces the student interested in human behavior to experimental design procedures emphasizing methodology, data collection techniques, and critical evaluation of research practices.
Prerequisites: ENG 124, MAT 120

PSY340 Physiological Psychology 3

This course provides the student with a knowledge of the biological components of behavior. Basic neuroanatomy and neurochemistry are discussed with respect to a variety of topics such as emotions, sensation, aggression, sleep, memory, reproductive behaviors, eating disorders, and certain forms of psychopathology.
Prerequisites: PSY 101 and junior or senior status
Offered in the fall semester only

PSY346 Health Psychology 3

This course explores the behavioral, cognitive, emotional, and social factors that affect physical health. Prevention, intervention, and treatment techniques will be discussed with an emphasis on approaches to changing unhealthy practices and maintaining health.
Prerequisite: PSY 101

PSY370 Social Psychology 3

Social behavior is studied from a psychological perspective. Topics addressed typically include: small group behavior, personal perception, attitude acquisition and change, leadership, conformity, and prejudice.
Prerequisites: PSY 101 and junior or senior status
Offered in the fall semester only

PSY421 Counseling Psychology 3

This course enables the more advanced student in psychology to gain an understanding of theories and techniques that facilitate individual and group well-being through the counseling process.
Prerequisite: PSY 101

PSY460 Senior Seminar 1 3

The Senior Seminar session is designed for the student who has completed her required Psychology coursework in the One-Day Program. In the Senior Seminars, the student will have an opportunity to synthesize the material learned in prior classes, witness its application in the professional setting, and learn more about the pursuit of graduate education and/or possible career opportunities. The courses will be structured to include, but may not be limited to, group discussions, review of the students portfolio, field trips, and guest lectures by practicing professionals. Prerequisite: PSY 421, and senior status

PSY461 Senior Seminar 2 3

The Senior Seminar session is designed for the student who has completed her required Psychology coursework in the One-Day Program. In the Senior Seminars, the student will have an opportunity to synthesize the material learned in prior classes, witness its application in the professional setting, and learn more about the pursuit of graduate education and/or possible career opportunities. The courses will be structured to include, but may not be limited to, group discussions, review of the students portfolio, field trips, and guest lectures by practicing professionals. Prerequisite: PSY 421, and senior status

PSY485 Psychology in the Field 3

This course requires students to use the totality of their learning within the Psychology program as they interact with experts in the field. Students will explore local and national professional affiliations, interview and shadow experts, and attend professional networking opportunities in the field. Major concepts in Psychology will be synthesized. Through assignments and reflective writing, students will examine their individual strengths, uncover potential biases, and continue professional growth and development. This course requried 5-10 hours of fieldwork and observation.
Prerequisite: PSY 101, Senior status

SCIELECT Science Elective 4  
SOC100 Principles of Sociology 3

SOC 100 (3 credits)
Principles of Sociology
This course introduces students to the major concepts and methods of sociology. Emphasis will be on the components of culture, the structure and institutions of society, the elements of social organization and differentiation, and sociological approaches to the analysis of groups.

SOC210 Marital & Family System 3

This course investigates the structure and function of the family as a social system. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationship between the family and other social institutions utilizing cross-cultural and historical perspectives. Discussions of marriage, family structure, family functioning, and family disorganization are included.
Prerequisite: PSY 101 or SOC 100
Offered in the spring semester

WEL220 WomenEmpoweredasLearnersLeader 3

Women as Empowered Leaders and Learners
This required interdisciplinary course is designed to give all students entering the One-Day Program a common experience and foundation for their education. Students examine leadership within the larger context of our interdependent world and their own strengths, values and aspirations. Students also examine learning styles, academic requirements, communication skills and technology to create a personalized action plan for success in the One-Day undergraduate experience and beyond.

WEL330 StratforPers&CareerGrwth 3

Strategies for Personal and Career Growth
This required interdisciplinary course builds on the foundation created in WEL 220 to deepen students' knowledge, skills and attitudes related to career, leadership and financial development. Through a focus on well being students will strategically delve into ways to manage their own growth and development while understanding the opportunities to build on their purpose, passion and potential.

WEL440 Leadership in Practice 3

This capstone course is an interdisciplinary course designed to give senior-level students an opportunity to create a learning experience that allows them to apply knowledge, skills and personal development to a project that also contributes to a family, organization and/or community. This course combines academic study with practical application of leadership, communications and technology skills as a springboard for the student to move forward into the future as an empowered woman. Students may choose to complete research, community-based projects and/or service learning projects. As a culminating experience, this course also provides the platform for assessing students' progress and proficiency.