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Course Requirements

Please note that course requirements are subject to change.

Code Course Name Credits
BUS204 Financial Wellness 1

Financial Wellness is a practical approach to making informed and empowering decisions about financial health. Students explore values, feelings and knowledge related to money, acquire basic financial knowledge and apply this knowledge to short and long term financial decisions. Curriculum is customized to individual student learning, with four required modules and two elective modules.

CIT210 Intercultural Communication 3

This course focuses on communicating effectively in a culturally-diverse world. Students receive a solid grounding in Cultural Anthropology combined with Interpersonal Communication theory and practice to develop knowledge and skills essential for communicating effectively across cultural borders. Through lectures, small group discussions, research projects, videos, and guest speakers, students learn first to identify other peoples cultural patterns and then to analyze strategies for adjusting their own communicative styles to resolve and to avoid intercultural conflicts. Students demonstrate proficiency in intercultural theory and practice through writing assignments, including a formal cross-cultural research paper; oral presentations; and a variety of class activities and assignments (Prerequisites: ENG114 and ENG124).

CMS305 Communicating in Liberal Studies 3

This course encourages students to develop professionally in fields related to the humanities with consideration of the unique viewpoints that study the human condition from the liberal studies vantage point. Focusing on the theme of 'professional conversations,' students are asked to think about what issues, debates, trends, etc., are happening in their fields of study and prospective careers. This course intends to equip students professionally and academically as they delve into their field of interest and think of their own contributions to their future profession (Prerequisites: ENG124).

EDU130 Education, Schools & Culture 3

The course presents a comprehensive examination of the field of education. Students will be exposed to the major historical, philosophical, economic, societal and cultural, professional, and accountability issues that continue to shape education within a complex, changing society. Required observations at public schools will augment classroom activities.

EDU211 Methods & Approaches to Teaching I 3

This early childhood course studies the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching and caring for young children. Topics include: philosophical constructs, program development, curriculum design and delivery, planning and organization, and instructional and classroom management techniques. Students will be introduced to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Students will participate in early childhood setting observations (Prerequisite: EDU110).

EDU212 Methods & Approaches to Teaching II 3

This course continues the study of the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching and caring for young children. Topics include: creative arts, mathematics, science and technology, history, early literacy and literature for young children. The Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks are used to plan and design instruction. Students will participate in a 20-hour field experience at the preschool or kindergarten level (Prerequisite: EDU211).

EDU300 Reading & Early Literacy 3

Students examine content, pedagogical, and assessment strategies for effective literacy instruction based upon guidelines in the Massachusetts English/Language Arts Curriculum Framework. Topics include techniques for fostering emergent literacy, vocabulary development, comprehension strategies, the interactive relationship between beginning reading and writing, and factors that put children at risk for literacy development. Included is an in-depth study of phonics as a system for teaching reading. Observations/fieldwork are required (Prerequisite: PSY205 or one course in education, junior status. Offered in the fall semester).

ENG114 Critical Reading & Response 3

This course introduces the integration of communication skills essential for effective reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college level. In this writing intensive course, students develop composition skills to produce collegiate-level papers modeling rhetorical modes and thematic content in addition to strategies for reading complex texts; presentation skills for personal introductions, verbal summaries of readings and response writings, and peer review of papers; and basic technological skills for word processing, e-mail, and introductory-level online research.

ENG124 Research & Writing in the Disciplines 3

In this course students will apply the practices for effective reading and writing introduced in ENG114 to the distinctive language and forms of various disciplines. This course lays the foundation for academic and professional research and stresses the use of appropriate and effective information sources. Readings for a variety of academic audiences will provide students with strategies to communicate in the sciences, business and technology, psychology, liberal studies, and the social sciences. Research and documentation skills appropriate to the disciplines are stressed. In addition to leading students through the research process from start to finish, this course will examine the many ramifications of academic honesty (Prerequisite: ENG114).

ENG134 Literary Genres 3

Selected readings in fiction, poetry, and drama introduce the student to literary types and techniques. These readings provide a basis for collegiate-level discussion, analysis, and the development of critical judgment. Building on the communications and research skills from earlier courses in the sequence, this course emphasizes continued practice in writing, and students complete a documented research paper using primary and secondary sources as one of the course writing assignments. Discussions and oral presentations based on assigned literature support the overall goal of the sequence: to enhance the advancement of the students, first academically and then professionally (Prerequisite: ENG114).

ENG210 Children's Literature 3

This course provides the opportunity to study literary concepts and purposes in writings designed primarily for, but not confined to, young minds. The heritage of children's literature is considered in relation to selected representative works, both traditional and recent. Also considered are the uses, presentation, and critical evaluation of children's literature from a multi-cultural, nonsexist and international perspective. This course addresses English standards for teachers in early childhood and elementary education: children's and young adult literature, genres, literary elements, and literary techniques (Prerequisite: ENG 134 Offered in the spring semester).

LAR499 Liberal Studies Internship 6  
PSY101 Introduction to Psychology 1 3

This course provides a basic foundation in psychology by introducing numerous psychological perspectives as explanations for human behavior and mental processes. Basic neurophysiology, consciousness, learning, personality theories, psychological disorders, and current interventions are discussed. This course is a prerequisite for all other psychology courses.

PSY205 Child Development 3

This course is a study of developmental changes from birth through 12 years old. Prenatal and neonatal issues are also discussed. Physical, emotional, social, and cognitive growth are explored at each age. The dominant theories of development are examined, as well as contemporary issues relating to childhood and parenting (Prerequisite: PSY101, offered in the spring semester only).

SOC100 Principles of Sociology 3

This course introduces students to the major concepts and methods of sociology. Emphasis will be on the components of culture, the structure and institutions of society, the elements of social organization and differentiation, and sociological approaches to the analysis of groups.

WEL100 Women as Empowered Learners & Leaders 3

Women as Empowered Learners and Leaders is an interdisciplinary course, designed to give all students entering Bay Path University a common experience and foundation for their education. This course is an introduction to the University, to academic study, and to various approaches to thinking about personal potential, to understand the process of becoming a learner, and a leader, and composing a life, to appreciate beauty, and work actively toward establishing community and justice in the context of being a woman at the beginning of the 21st century.

WEL310 Strategies for Career & Personal Growth 1

(This course is graded Pass/Fail.) In their junior year before the opening of the spring semester, baccalaureate degree students will be offered a special opportunity to learn up-to-date information about the current work world in an intensive two-and-a-half-day workshop format. Students will meet successful professionals who will discuss the challenges and opportunities of their respective fields and help students prepare for interviews as well as learn how to navigate the early stages of their new careers.

WEL400 WELL in Practice 3

By WEL400, you will be ready to blend all the skills you have learned during the WELL program—leadership, critical thinking, research, writing, analysis, and public presentation—with a community service project. Empathy, respect, and tolerance are the core human values that are stressed. It’s what every good leader needs to confidently show the way.

XXXXXX General Electives 10  
XXXXXX Global Requirements 6

(Prerequisites: EDU110 & EDU250)

XXXXXX Healthy Living Elective 1  
XXXXXX Lab Science Elective 4  
XXXXXX Mathematics Elective 3  
XXXXXX English Elective 3  
XXXXXX History Electives 6  
XXXXXX Language Electives 6  
XXXXXX Science Elective 4  
XXXXXX Liberal Arts Electives 9