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Psychology On Ground Weekdays

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

The Psychology program at Bay Path is designed to prepare students for employment in a wide variety of settings as well as to position students for further study at the graduate level.

The major in Psychology provides students with a well-rounded education for thinking critically about human behavior and thought processes, and by promoting an understanding of the relationship among theories, observations, and conclusions."

Students learn the stages of development throughout the lifespan, theories for understanding personality and social behaviors, how the brain functions, mental illness, interviewing and counseling skills, and how cultural influences shape identity. 

Our program follows the learning objectives and guidelines from the American Psychological Association. Bay Path values experiential learning, and requires an internship during senior year, in which students can apply the theories and communication skills learned in class to an actual setting. Students will gain valuable experience at various sites including: state social service departments, early intervention programs, youth development programs, family support outreach programs, and adolescent residential-treatment programs.

Three Year Accelerated Degree Option:

Students with a record of strong academic achievement and a desire to fast track their education are encouraged to apply to the accelerated degree program. The program allows students to earn their Psychology degree in three years of year-round study, enabling them to save on tuition costs and enter the workforce sooner.

Course Requirements

Code Course Name Credits
ENG114 Critical Reading & Response 3

This course introduces the integration of communication skills essential for effective reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college level. In this writing intensive course, students develop composition skills to produce collegiate-level papers modeling rhetorical modes and thematic content in addition to strategies for reading complex texts; presentation skills for personal introductions, verbal summaries of readings and response writings, and peer review of papers; and basic technological skills for word processing, e-mail, and introductory-level online research.

ENG124 Research/Writing in Discipline 3

In this course students will apply the practices for effective reading and writing introduced in ENG 114 to the distinctive language and forms of various disciplines. This course lays the foundation for academic and professional research and stresses the use of appropriate and effective information sources. Readings for a variety of academic audiences will provide students with strategies to communicate in the sciences, business and technology, psychology, liberal studies, and the social sciences. Research and documentation skills appropriate to the disciplines are stressed. In addition to leading students through the research process from start to finish, this course will examine the many ramifications of academic honesty. Prerequisite: ENG 114

ENG134 Literary Genres 3

Selected readings in fiction, poetry, and drama introduce the student to literary types and techniques. These readings provide a basis for collegiate-level discussion, analysis, and the development of critical judgment. Building on the communications and research skills from earlier courses in the sequence, this course emphasizes continued practice in writing, and students complete a documented research paper using primary and secondary sources as one of the course writing assignments. Discussions and oral presentations based on assigned literature support the overall goal of the sequence: to enhance the advancement of the students, first academically and then professionally. Prerequisite: ENG 114

INT250 Research Methods in Social Sciences 3

Students will develop and understanding of the basic principles of research in the Social Sciences, grasp the importance of Scientific Research, and comprehend research methodologies. Reaserch ethics, data collection techniques and analysis, sampling, and inferential statistics will be studied. Students will be required to produce a scholarly proposal. Prerequisites: MAT120 and ENG124

MAT112 Applied College Mathematics 3

This course is designed for diverse students to acquire a solid foundation in non-calculus mathematics. It uses practical mathematics to develop problem solving and analytical skills. Topics include linear equations, linear inequalities, matrix and its application, linear programming, and the simplex method. Prerequisite: MAT 104 or appropriate placement test score

MAT120 Statistics 3

This is an introduction to the basic descriptive and inferential statistics for students from all disciplines. It emphasizes the development of statistical literacy and the use of computer for analyzing data. Topics include principles of experimental design; graphical and numerical methods for summarizing, describing, exploring and analyzing data; binomial and normal probability distributions; point and interval estimates for means and proportions; hypothesis testing; and correlation and regression. Offered both semesters

PSY101 Introduction to Psychology 1 3

This course provides a basic foundation in psychology by introducing numerous psychological perspectives as explanations for human behavior and mental processes. Basic neurophysiology, consciousness, learning, personality theories, psychological disorders, and current interventions are discussed. This course is a prerequisite for all other psychology courses

PSY102 Introduction to Psychology 2 3

Introduction to Psychology II This course is a continuation of PSY 101 and is required for all general psychology majors. It continues the exploration of the broad variety of areas studied in psychology, including motivation, memory, cognition, thinking and learning, and stress and health. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in PSY 101 Offered in the spring semester

PSY205 Child Development 3

This course is a study of developmental changes from birth through 12 years old. Prenatal and neonatal issues are also discussed. Physical, emotional, social, and cognitive growth are explored at each age. The dominant theories of development are examined, as well as contemporary issues relating to childhood and parenting. Prerequisite: PSY 101 Offered in the spring semester only

PSY206 Adolescent & Adult Development 3

This course surveys how people develop and change from the onset of adolescence through late adulthood. Different theoretical perspectives and contemporary information relating to the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive realms are examined. Prerequisite: PSY 101 Offered in the fall semester only

PSY240 Abnormal Psychology 3

This course explores a wide range of personality, behavioral, and cognitive disorders. The symptoms, etiology, and dynamics of various disorders are studied, and a variety of therapeutic theories and techniques are discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 101 Offered in the spring semester only

PSY321 Theories of Personality 3

This course investigates the major personality theorists from Freud to more recent and contemporary theorists like May and Rogers. Emphasis is placed on the critical evaluation and practical application of each theory reviewed. Prerequisite: PSY 101 and junior or senior status Offered in the spring semester only

PSY340 Physiological Psychology 3

This course provides the student with a knowledge of the biological components of behavior. Basic neuroanatomy and neurochemistry are discussed with respect to a variety of topics such as emotions, sensation, aggression, sleep, memory, reproductive behaviors, eating disorders, and certain forms of psychopathology. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and junior or senior status Offered in the fall semester only

PSY370 Social Psychology 3

Social behavior is studied from a psychological perspective. Topics addressed typically include: small group behavior, personal perception, attitude acquisition and change, leadership, conformity, and prejudice. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and junior or senior status Offered in the fall semester only

PSY380 Interviewing & Counseling 3

This course introduces fundamental skills used in the helping profession including, interviewing, developing rapport, and elements of the counseling process. The multicultural, ethical and legal considerations, non-verbal behavior, and self-care will also be addressed. Prerequisites: PSY101, Jr/Sr status

PSY430 Clinical Psychology 3

This course explores some the key areas within the field of clinical psychology, with particular emphasis on assessment (cognitive, personality, and diagnostic) and treatment (crisis intervention and psychotherapy). Various forms of phychotherapy, including psychodynamic, cogvitive, and humanistic/experiential therapy, will also be examined. Prerequisties: PSY101, PSY240, and Jr/Sr status

PSY499 Psychology Internship 3

(This course is graded Pass/Fail.) Students receive supervised training from practicing professionals normally during the final semester of the fourth year. Learning is achieved through observation and/or direct participation. Students are placed appropriately in settings that relate to their individual and educational career objectives. Sites may include public educational facilities, human services agencies, mental health clinics, and law enforcement and criminal justice agencies. Prerequisites: A minimum cgpa of 2.0, senior status, and approval of department chair. Open only to psychology majors