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Counseling Foundations Online

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

Take your career in the mental health field a step further with the Counseling Foundations concentration in the Psychology major. Providing students the opportunity to make a profound difference in the lives of others, the Counseling Foundations concentration exposes students to the latest theories and research through relevant, high-quality courses. Students are also allowed to practice these vital skills through classroom instruction, observations, and internships. Emphasis is placed on the traditional perspectives, knowledge of research design, understanding the etiology of normal and abnormal behavior, human development, dynamics and interaction, problem resolution, legal and ethical concerns, intervention and assessment.

Course Requirements

Code Course Name Credits
BIO109 Biology I 4

This course will examine basic concepts of cellular biology, developmental biology, genetic variation and heredity, and evolution. Laboratory sessions will involve mitosis, embryology, heredity and recombinant DNA technology, and biochemical evolution. (Lab fee: $35)

CIT300 Communicating for Leadership 3

As the final course in the CIT core, Communicating for Leadership serves as a bridge to upper-level courses in students fields of study. Furthermore, different sections are taught by instructors in these fields. This allows students to study the specialized communication styles and demands associated with effective leadership in their majors; that is, business majors study corporate communications; students in legal studies examine communication models and strategies for conflict resolution, liberal studies majors draw upon multimedia skills and technologies to enhance their communications, etc. Through readings, writing projects, discussions, and role-plays, students also study interpersonal communication skills, verbal and non-verbal communication, the dynamics and ethics of interviewing, and organizational and small group communication. While writing, reading, listening, and information literacy are integrated into the course, the course offers explicit instruction in public speaking and offers students opportunities to practice speaking to multiple and complex audiences in forums relevant to their fields of study. Prerequisite: ENG 114, ENG 122, and ENG124

COM111 Computer Applications I 3

This course uses a hands-on approach to have students explore computer hardware and software concepts. Students will identify and explain the principle components of computers and their use. They will utilize a Graphical User Interface Windows environment to handle basic commands and functions via the toolbars; work with drives, folders, and files; and manage disks. Students will define and apply the four basic computer operations of input, processing, output, and storage, using hardware and software application devices for documentation creation and production. Students will use Microsoft Word to create and format correspondence, tabulations, and reports. Students will use Microsoft PowerPoint to plan, design, and create professional and colorful screen presentations, overhead transparencies, outlines, speakers notes, and audience handouts. Students will also be introduced to the Internets search engines, bookmarks, and digital library.

ENG114 Critical Reading & Response 3

This course introduces the integration of communication skills essential for effective reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college level. In this writing intensive course, students develop composition skills to produce collegiate-level papers modeling rhetorical modes and thematic content in addition to strategies for reading complex texts; presentation skills for personal introductions, verbal summaries of readings and response writings, and peer review of papers; and basic technological skills for word processing, e-mail, and introductory-level online research.

ENG124 Research and Writing in the Disciplines 3

In this course students will apply the practices for effective reading and writing introduced in ENG 114 to the distinctive language and forms of various disciplines. This course lays the foundation for academic and professional research and stresses the use of appropriate and effective information sources. Readings for a variety of academic audiences will provide students with strategies to communicate in the sciences, business and technology, psychology, liberal studies, and the social sciences. Research and documentation skills appropriate to the disciplines are stressed. In addition to leading students through the research process from start to finish, this course will examine the many ramifications of academic honesty. Prerequisite: ENG 114

ENG134 Literary Genres 3

Selected readings in fiction, poetry, and drama introduce the student to literary types and techniques. These readings provide a basis for collegiate-level discussion, analysis, and the development of critical judgment. Building on the communications and research skills from earlier courses in the sequence, this course emphasizes continued practice in writing, and students complete a documented research paper using primary and secondary sources as one of the course writing assignments. Discussions and oral presentations based on assigned literature support the overall goal of the sequence: to enhance the advancement of the students, first academically and then professionally. Prerequisite: ENG 114

MAT112 Applied College Mathematics 3

This course is designed for diverse students to acquire a solid foundation in non-calculus mathematics. It uses practical mathematics to develop problem solving and analytical skills. Topics include linear equations, linear inequalities, matrix and its application, linear programming, and the simplex method. Prerequisite: MAT 104 or appropriate placement test score

PSY101 Introduction to Psychology 1 3

This course provides a basic foundation in psychology by introducing numerous psychological perspectives as explanations for human behavior and mental processes. Basic neurophysiology, consciousness, learning, personality theories, psychological disorders, and current interventions are discussed. This course is a prerequisite for all other psychology courses

PSY205 Child Development 3

This course is a study of developmental changes from birth through 12 years old. Prenatal and neonatal issues are also discussed. Physical, emotional, social, and cognitive growth are explored at each age. The dominant theories of development are examined, as well as contemporary issues relating to childhood and parenting. Prerequisite: PSY 101 Offered in the spring semester only

PSY206 Adolescent & Adult Development 3

This course surveys how people develop and change from the onset of adolescence through late adulthood. Different theoretical perspectives and contemporary information relating to the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive realms are examined. Prerequisite: PSY 101 Offered in the fall semester only

PSY240 Abnormal Psychology 3

This course explores a wide range of personality, behavioral, and cognitive disorders. The symptoms, etiology, and dynamics of various disorders are studied, and a variety of therapeutic theories and techniques are discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 101 Offered in the spring semester only

PSY312 Psychological Stastics 3

This course provides students with foundational knowledge stastical analyses and assessment methods that are commonly used in Psychology and th Social Sciences. Students will learn how to identify, propberly utilize, and interpret analyses for various typs of testing data and assessment tools. Pre-req: PSY323

PSY323 Behavioral Research Methods 3

This course introduces the student interested in human behavior to experimental design procedures emphasizing methodology, data collection techniques, and critical evaluation of research practices. Prerequisites: MAT 120, two courses in Psychology, and junior or senior status Offered in the spring semester only

PSY332 Cognitive Psychology & Neurosciene 3

This course provides students with a foundation in Cognitive Neuroscience, which deals with the study of the relationship between brain and behavior, specifically the neurological systems that underly complex mental processes such as attention, perception, learning, memory, language and emotion. The course will introduce students to methods used to study cognitive functioning and healthy persons, as well as, those in neurological patients.

PSY370 Social Psychology 3

Social behavior is studied from a psychological perspective. Topics addressed typically include: small group behavior, personal perception, attitude acquisition and change, leadership, conformity, and prejudice. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and junior or senior status Offered in the fall semester only

PSY405 Counseling Diverse Populations 3

This course provides students with an understanding of the sociocultural context that influence personal biases and the explanations of psychological processes. Students will be invited to consider the roles of power and priviledge in the development of psychological theories and methods.

PSY406 Counseling Ethics & Profess Develop 3

This course provides students with the foundation in counseling ethics. This course will cover basic ethical principles such as informed consent and confidentiality; during this course, students will demonstrate an understanding of ethics by comparing codes across the mental health professions. This course will also cover professional issues such as self-awarness and the business of psychopathology.

PSY407 Interviewing & Counseling 3

This course provides students with knowledge of introductory skills. This course will cover basic skills common across the helping professions. Students will demonstrate competence with basic skills in an educational setting through role plays.

PSY430 Clinical Psychology 3

This course explores some the key areas within the field of clinical psychology, with particular emphasis on assessment (cognitive, personality, and diagnostic) and treatment (crisis intervention and psychotherapy). Various forms of phychotherapy, including psychodynamic, cogvitive, and humanistic/experiential therapy, will also be examined. Prerequisties: PSY101, PSY240, and Jr/Sr status

SOC100 Principles of Sociology 3

This course introduces students to the major concepts and methods of sociology. Emphasis will be on the components of culture, the structure and institutions of society, the elements of social organization and differentiation, and sociological approaches to the analysis of groups.

WEL220 Women as Empowered Leaders and Learners 3

This required interdisciplinary course is designed to give all students entering the One-Day Program a common experience and foundation for their education. Students examine leadership within the larger context of our interdependent world and their own strengths, values and aspirations. Students also examine learning styles, academic requirements, communication skills and technology to create a personalized action plan for success in the One-Day undergraduate experience and beyond.

WEL330 Strategies for Personal and Career Growth 3

This required interdisciplinary course builds on the foundation created in WEL 220 to deepen students knowledge, skills and attitudes related to career, leadership and financial development. Through a focus on well being students will strategically delve into ways to manage their own growth and development while understanding the opportunities to build on their purpose, passion and potential.

WEL440 Leadership in Practice 3

This capstone course is an interdisciplinary course designed to give senior-level students an opportunity to create a learning experience that allows them to apply knowledge, skills and personal development to a project that also contributes to a family, organization and/or community. This course combines academic study with practical application of leadership, communications and technology skills as a springboard for the student to move forward into the future as an empowered woman. Students may choose to complete research, community-based projects and/or service learning projects. As a culminating experience, this course also provides the platform for assessing students progress and proficiency.